Monthly Archives: August 2015

Two years down the line.

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It’s been some time since I posted and thought it about time I considered my progress here. 

I successfully got myself off the Tramadol completely. It was an awful month and I felt unwell for another month after that. Not helped of course because when you come off something it needs to be replaced by something else – and that wasn’t there. The effects of the Tramadol made me feel still as though I had a bad flu.

Help was at hand eventually. As nothing surgically could or would be done about my spine (and I don’t much want yet more surgery anyway) I was sent by my GP to Physio. After a few sessions I was referred on to Dr Graeme Brown, who wrote a book I already had on my counselling shelf http://www.amazon.co.uk/How-Liberate-Yourself-Pain-Practical/dp/1899398171/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1439909927&sr=8-1-fkmr1&keywords=graham+brown+pain

and then to his physio team who put me on a functional restoration course. I was sure if this meant I was going to be stuffed, upholstered and auctioned off, but I was happy to give anything a go. It was an assessment, twice a week for 3 weeks and then a final assessment to see what progress was made. Five of us started in week 1. By session 2 there were 2 of us. Not a great start! At one session there was only me. So much for the group experience. The course was a system of exercises to show whether we were responding in a boom or bust fashion and to learn how to pace ourselves to increase activity, in addition to building flexibility and strength. There were talks on realistic goal setting and it was all very much CBT based. However, for me it worked. It gave me permission to not give up and decide I couldn’t do things because if I worked at it then – just perhaps – I could.

I could walk about 500m with sticks and swim 1km. If only I could swim everywhere! I built up little by little with walks with my family, swimming weekly and doing a mixture of the physio exercises with Pilates to make a programme of my own.

Cutting a long story short then.

I do seem to have reached a plateau where I get to 2 – 2.5km and don’t seem to be able to improve. However, I just did 2.3km this afternoon without any sticks. Admittedly I was limping by the time I got home, and this is not necessarily a good thing, but I still did it. I find after about 800m I can feel my left hip swelling. My left side continues to be noticeably weaker than my right and I don’t seem to be able to progress this strength with exercise. That is also the side affected by the nerve pain from my spine and had both a hip and knee replaced.

We took our holiday on our boat. Only a week out of the two, but I walked between locks and managed lock paddles and gates too – often twice each when they were not set in our direction. The worst day was the mistake of walking 2/3 km – a big misjudgement on the map – which wouldn’t have been too bad had it not been in the middle of working through 9 locks.

I can climb the stairs without much thought – usually without holding the banister, unless I am tired. 

I have been doing some gardening, albeit much more restricted than a few years ago but considerably better than more recent years.

Pain is not bad – certainly not worse than it was on Tramadol. It was replaced with Naproxen which I take with Paracetamol. The Paracetamol seems to enhance the effect. I take 2 Amatryptaline (I know that spelling is wrong!) at night to help with the nerve pain. It does seem to be better, unless I overdo things.

There are down sides – I can feel arthritis pain in other parts of my body – further up my spine aches badly and wants to bend me forwards when I walk, my left shoulder and down my left arm, and more recently my hands and feet – especially hands, have become acutely painful and I have take care of them now. Sometimes I watch them pull into spasms I have to gradually ease out of them again.

But what would it be like if I hadn’t had the replacements? It has been hard, especially having them so close together. It made me very weak and unfit and it is a lot to pull back from. But two years down the line I can do these things. They might not be much more than before the surgery – but it’s certainly not worse, and the experience of my upper body tells me by now they would have been much much worse. Two years ago I was in a wheelchair much of the time if I got out of the house at all. Now I’m walking to the river and back with my son.

It was worth it!